The Blog of Cafe Dissensus Magazine – we DISSENT

Posts from the ‘Looking Back’ category

Café Dissensus completes second year

By The Editors
Numbers never say much. Yet, they could be quite revealing at times. Here we quote a part of the year-end report that we received from Wordpress, our website host: “The concert hall at the Sydney Opera House holds 2,700 people. Café Dissensus Everyday was viewed about 23,000 times in 2014. If it were a concert at Sydney Opera House, it would take about 9 sold-out performances for that many people to see it…The most popular post for the year was An Interview with Actor, Nandita Das.”

Nemo: When we go to war, they go to war

By Achyut Dutt
That was the fun side of Nemo, but there was another side, the one he was trained to be. A killer. That was something everyone who came in contact with him had to remember, including his handler, me. Nemo was trained to be a cold-blooded killing machine when the order was given. And the kill order was usually a terse, “Get him!” Unless he happened to be a very good shot and quick on the draw, the other guy wouldn’t survive the encounter.

Nurturing a Magazine: A Year of Café Dissensus

By Mary Ann Chacko & Mosarrap H. Khan, Editors
As it often happens, a new venture always lacks credibility. As our culture increasingly becomes celebrity-driven, those who see themselves as self-important hesitate to associate with new obscure ventures. Below I narrate a couple of incidents that showcase the challenge of convincing authors to write for us.

Nafisa and Hyderabad: The Social Activist and the City

By Mosarrap H. Khan
Nizam’s Hyderabad metamorphosed into a shiny, new city with wide roads, modern steel-and-glass structures, swanky cars, and multinational eateries. Ten days into my stay, I was on my way to the Old City, originally founded by the Nizams. Once on the periphery of the Nizam’s city, the landscape was perceptible different.

From Jogeshwari to Azad Maidan: A detour through Govandi

By Rama Akhtar
I live in a Muslim ghetto in Jogeshwari (East). I am aware that this sounds jarring and may reek of stereotyping right from the first sentence since ‘Muslims’ and ‘ghettoes’ have been co-related more often than not. My house is inside a narrow by-lane seconds from the main road and across this road lies a Hindu ghetto.