The Blog of Cafe Dissensus Magazine – we DISSENT

Obsession with marks: A crisis in India’s schooling system

By Shahid Jamal
In one of his most celebrated books, Deschooling Society, Ivan Illich writes, “schooling in developing nations is used to create new elites with a consumerist mentality.” This seems very true to me when I closely look at the pedagogy of modern schooling system. The present schooling system clearly divides our society on the socio-economic ground.

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Disobedient Pictures: A Doodler’s Journey and the Allegory of Art

By Ananya Dutta Gupta
I had always been driven by the desire to express myself. Until I came to doodling, I had always sought the catharsis of involved, complex prose. The catharsis had come from the writing out of such prose, and not just the web of thoughts peering to come out of the womb of the mind. My pictures are my vicarious revenge and redemption for self-repression.

Kerala: Neglecting one’s past is a betrayal of identity

By Mujeeb Jaihoon
K. N. Kurup, one among the last stock of Kerala’s living eminent historians, expressed a similar view as he shared his pain over the neglect of Thuhfathul Mujahideen, the seminal historical work of Sheikh Zainuddin Makhdum, South India’s Sufi saint and philosopher of the 16th century, also known as the Thucydides of Kerala.

Understanding post-partum depression

By Rimli Bhattacharya
Most mothers with postpartum depression recover completely. This is especially true if the illness is diagnosed and treated early. About 50% of women who recover from postpartum depression develop the illness again after future pregnancies.

Three Poems

By Junaid Ashraf
Half the life of a Muslim is spent in suffering
As the victim of the terrorism and the other half
In explaining to the world that he is not a terrorist!

Taboo(-ed) and Terror(-ised): The Hermeneutics of Menstruation

By Soma Mandal
The imagination of a Hindu Rashtra (Hindu nation) with a Hindu Nari (woman) at the centre epitomizing Savitri and Sita as ideal figures of femininity and virtue established the idea of a Hindu masculine state that could rule the non-Hindu world. The human reproduction cycle made explicit by menstruation did not fit the clean image of Sita and Savitri and polluted the purity of hyper-masculine Hindu text and the sub-text of Hindu life-forms which needed to be lived through piety and worship.

The Tragedy of Easter Sunday in Sri Lanka

By Caroline Vimla & Inamul Haq
Whatever the answer to the question above may be, the fact remains that every one of such violent attacks causes immense grief, pain and suffering, and as such, they are to be regarded as nothing lesser than a crime against humanity. Terrorism has no religion.

The Election Commission of India: In search of a credible autonomous institution in India

By Shahid Jamal
Despite a clear warning from the Election Commission prohibiting political parties from using the name of armed forces for political gain in any manner during election campaign, Modi went ahead and asked people to dedicate their votes to the Martyrs of Pulwama and heroes of Balakot air strikes. India has seen many Prime Ministers losing elections but has never seen a PM losing his marbles.

Emotional abuse: The silent killer

By Rimli Bhattacharya
Emotional abuse in the absence of physical abuse is often unrecognized. Although the literature identifies the insidious nature of this type of abuse and the physiological, psychological and emotional harm it often causes, knowledge of how women come to recognize they are being emotionally abused is underdeveloped.

The need for ‘Love After Babel’

By Chanchal Kumar
Love After Babel will be remembered as the prime example of a poet’s love letter to language, which can be a reluctant, unyielding beloved. Its appearance in our midst couldn’t have been timelier. We needed a Love After Babel to remind us why Dalit poetry has always been far superior to Brahmin-savarna’s, in other words, the mainstream’s attempts at writing verse, not that we had any doubt to begin with.