The Blog of Cafe Dissensus Magazine – we DISSENT

Posts from the ‘Reportage’ category

Money vs Cricket : Why the World Cup is too long and predictable

By Sahal Muhammed
The game still retains a little bit of that magic despite the best efforts of ICC. For instance, the pulsating game where Ireland beat Zimbabwe to ensure that the only meagre source of excitement in Pool B, an unlikely possibility that Ireland can finish ahead of West Indies, is kept alive.

Photo-Essay: Drone Rugs from Pakistan

By Cafe Dissensus
It appears through these rugs, the women are sending out a message of aesthetic resistance against western drone attacks in the border region of Pakistan and Afghanistan, where violence is an everyday reality.

Remembering the one giant leap: Apollo moon landing

By Achyut Dutt
It was a strangely exhilarating moment for me too, one that I have had the honor to live through and experience, as a 14-year old. During that time, I was in a harsh boarding school, against my wishes. A scrawny shy kid, easily bullied, who had decided to curl up within himself and shut out the reality of a nightmarish Darwinesque existence inside the dorms.

Rural India: Tales of children of the desert…

By Akshatha Shetty & Piyush Goswami
While some of the children travel with the villagers all round the year hopping from one fair to another, the others live in the neighboring slum areas. These kids cannot afford to go to school but they are quite happy doing what they do. When they are not hassling tourists, the kids are often seen collecting camel or cow dung, which is dried and later sold to herders and villagers as fuel.

Rural India: The day we met Krishna…

By Akshatha Shetty
Despite the early onset of winter, the scorching heat of Rajasthan enslaves every soul. Dust rose and settled like smoke from a dragon’s flared nostrils. Far ahead, we heard the familiar chattering of three Rajasthani women clad in vibrant colors. Their hips swayed to the tunes of the earth, while their shoulders bore the burden of poverty.

Documentary: Muzaffarnagar Bleeds: A Reenactment of Gujarat Riots, 2002

By Mosarrap H. Khan
Both the ANHAD and the Citizens’ Report detail the gruesome killings, looting, and assault on women during the riots. Vaseela from village Laakh narrates that her daughter was brutally gang raped and then burnt alive. On the 8th of September, when the family was fleeing their village, her daughter, who was keeping unwell, was caught by four men and gang raped. She was then burnt alive.

Life was Beautiful…: A Dalit Student Ends his Life

By Chapparban Sajaudeen Nijamodeen
The student community requested the Vice-Chancellor, Prof. Ramakrishna Ramaswamy, to show the concrete steps that have been taken to resolve Dalit students’ problems regarding discriminations, suicides, and mental harassments. This action was demanded in light of the Pulyala Raju Committee Report. A Dalit student, Mr. Pulyala Raju, was enrolled in the integrated Linguistics course. He committed suicide in 2012.

Akhtar Haji Murder Case: Doubtful Role of Police

By Mahmud Hassan
In Samsherganj area of the Murshidabad district, an anti-liquor movement has been going on for the last few years. For a S2 concerted effort, people in the locality formed a civic body, Nagarik Adhikar Suraksha Manch, which includes people from different sections of the society such as social activists, local leaders, intellectuals and so on.

Media and Moral Policing: The TV9 Report on UoH Students

By Abu Saleh
After watching the report, the UoH campus community took it seriously. Students responded in social media about the misrepresentation of campus life. False allegations like portraying students as drug and sex addicts were seen as moral policing. Further, it led to a larger debate when the report suggested that the non-locals were damaging ‘culture’ here.

Book Review: Basharat Peer’s Curfewed Night

By Shaik Zakeer Hussain
Basharat Peer’s Curfewed Night (2010) is an intensely passionate memoir about the struggle for freedom and justice inpeer what one former U.S president described as the ‘world’s most dangerous place.’ The story of Kashmir is set against the backdrop of Peer’s life and his life is interwoven with the melancholy of his homeland and its inhabitants.