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Posts from the ‘Education’ category

A Response to the Ambedkar Reading Group

By Souradeep Roy
This is a response to the ‘Statement on Student Protest’ by the Ambedkar Reading Group and some other points of discourse. The Ambedkar Reading Group alleges that the language and manner of protests carried out by the students of MA English, University of Delhi, is casteist. The critique in my article makes a close reading of the ARG’s concerns and accepts that casteist remarks were indeed made by students. This piece largely argues that both the ARG and the students are against one common enemy: the brahminical system of appointments.

Out of Touch? How this Response to Hokkolorob at Jadavpur University Distracts from its Graded Social Dynamics

By Joyeeta Dey & Anushka Sen
The movement protesting police violence against students in Jadavpur University, Kolkata, is right now in its most vulnerable position. The marching has calmed, a high court order aimed at restoring “normalcy” to the campus has been implemented, the issue is beginning to fade from television and the public imagination, while, in all this time, not a single demand of the protestors has been met.

Dear Education Minister of Chhattisgarh, is it okay to inflict corporal punishment on students?

By Joyeeta Dey
Children’s rights activists with their wealth of data condemning the efficacy of CP (that it teaches the child nothing, perpetuates violence in later life, and leads to lower academic performance) reach an impasse when faced with adults who vouch for it based on their own experience. While one may try to dismiss this as nostalgic idealizing of one’s childhood it is much more important to realize the irrelevance of trying to answer whether it ‘works’ or not.

Italian Memories

By Sowmya Dechamma
For a moment, I imagined medieval royals enjoying a pleasant sunny day. It was sunny and I let the sun fall on my back. I could hear a bird – loud and shrill, and tried unsuccessfully to spot it. As I listened it became louder and shriller, shutting out all other sounds of insects and birds. It took me some effort to focus my ears onto the other sounds.

We write, therefore we think…and imagine: The School for Children Writers

By Ursula Estrada
The games that enable children to learn new writing tools are sometimes carried out with the help of props. Puppet theaters have been used to collectively create a play through a performance. At other times, a little plastic mouse has triggered a game in which children create their own version of Mouse City: they first draw a map of it and write a set of directions to find a hidden treasure, which other students will later follow, moving the mouse through the map.

The Case of the Green Board and the Fear of Islamization

By Mary Ann Chacko
Education is never ideologically neutral and debates over the communalization of education are not new in India. For instance, from 1998 – 2000, the national government was led by the National Democratic Alliance (NDA), a coalition government, led by the Hindu right-wing Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP). This period was marked by, what critics of the right-wing government refer to as the process of “saffronisation.”

A “teacher, but not trained”: David Horsburgh and the Neel Bagh Experiment

By Sachin Tiwari
A unique feature at the school was the question hour, where students would gather and raise questions that came to their mind. These sessions were not structured with a purpose to “teach” the children but were designed to work with observations made by the children themselves. Thus curiosity served as a point of entry and inquiry into a larger area of concern for everyone.

Firm No to Modi-sarkar

The incumbent JNUSU has called upon the students to join a campaign against BJP’s Prime Ministerial candidate Narendra Modi in Varanasi, although it has not specified which candidate would it support. The Akhil Bhartiya Vidyarthi Parishad – student wing of the RSS – brought out a vicious pamphlet attacking the JNUSU’s call for campaign against Modi.

My Rendezvous with Humaira Bachal

By Mosarrap H. Khan
Humaira’s story is one which is perhaps easy to sell as it stands now: from extreme poverty to success and promise. But this is also a story which had to be scripted before it could even be sold. Humaira believed in her story. If she is now the center of attention and admiration, she has written it painstakingly with the help of her mother.

Joy, self-confidence, and trust: teenagers’ experiences in theater

By Ursula T. Estrada
El Telon’s pedagogy is based on the principles of respect, mutual trust, group spirit, and play – the main ingredient of all exercises. Every session is designed so that each exercise leads progressively into the next, developing each individual’s expressive abilities. As children get to know each other through play, an environment of trust is created among them.

Digantar: A Glimpse at an Alternative Approach to Education

By Riti Das Dhankar
Every step that leads towards an unconventional path is met with impediments and speculations. It is easy to gain support for an established idea but not for an alternative one. A school that debunks the idea of classrooms and has groups where every child is at a different level is not something that would go down well with parents, whose idea of a school is one where the teacher writes on the blackboard and every child in the classroom is at the same level.

Adharshila Shikshan Kendra: Reconstituting Possibilities for Adivasi Children

By Karishma Desai
Adharshila has thoughtfully embedded local Adivasi political ecological knowledge in curricula and overall school practices. For example, in one curricular inquiry project, students collect folk tales from their own villages and analyze relations between self, community, nature, and world. In another unit, students collect oral histories from village elders to understand why the arid mountain behind their school community was called Reech (bear), considering it did not represent an environment that bears would live in.