The Blog of Cafe Dissensus Magazine – we DISSENT

Posts from the ‘Film’ category

A Chapter in World Cinema: Ebbing Innocence in Theo Angelopoulos’ ‘Landscape in the Mist’

By Rituparna Borah
The director, Theo Angelopoulos, almost certainly aims to illustrate through the movie how humanity, disillusioned, aspires to go back to where it began: to its roots.

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A Chapter in World Cinema: The never-ending search for ‘home’ in Wong Kar-Wai’s movies

By Rituparna Borah
Ever so subtly, with a diligent play of colours, facial expressions and moving monologues, Kar-Wai brings home the anguish of homelessness with acute finesse, thereby kindling unwonted emotions even in those of us, who wallow in the feeling of having a home.

Film Review: Shoojit Sircar’s ‘Piku’

By Riti Das Dhankar
Shoojit Sircar’s Piku is sheer magic in the way it captures ordinary life. It’s a sensitive portrayal of a father and daughter relationship. The magic in the movie comes from the brutal honesty and deep love that the duo shares for each other, despite being in an unenviable situation.

The Mars Club Member’s Daughter

By Achyut Dutt
Jyoti Singh’s rape hasn’t changed anything in India. There is that Guinness Book record that India still holds and will continue holding – of being the place where every 20 minutes, there is a rape. That works out to 72 rapes a day, a nice round figure.

Fifty Shades of Stupidity

By Riti Das Dhankar
Fifty Shades of Grey is a stereotypical love story with a supposedly “normal” girl being a complete nut-job and the “troubled” Mr Grey being the only consistent, non-weird thing in the movie.

Natasha Raheja’s ‘Cast in India’ (2014)

By Mosarrap H. Khan
Natasha’s film works on two different registers: first, it reveals to us the extensive labor infrastructure and social life behind the everyday objects that we encounter in the built environment of the city, thereby highlighting our own alienation in modern life; second, it exposes the hazardous working conditions that are masked by the shiny surfaces of our great metropolises.

Just imagine you are Hank the 8th: Put yourself in King Henry VIII’s shoes

By Achyut Dutt
Maids-in-waiting are nubile young girls from noble families who are ostensibly employed on an honorary basis by the queen to keep her company and help her get dressed and all. However, their actual job profile and key performance criteria are to get laid by the King whenever he wishes. In this, Anne Boleyn excels and you’re soon infatuated. She has there massive baobabs you love getting lost in, don’t you now, you horny bastard.

Satyajit Ray’s Apu Trilogy: Celebrating Life Through the Vision of Death

By Lopa Banerjee
Exuding a raw energy and supreme power of art, the entire Apu trilogy, on the surface level, traces the epic journey of the protagonist, Apu, from his impoverished rural boyhood to his years in Baranas and Calcutta and, finally, to his marriage and fatherhood. On a more metaphysical plane, the three films depict the unique life of the protagonist in various stages, repeatedly facing deep spiritual questions centered round the vision of death.

Film Review: Michel Khleifi’s Wedding in Galilee (1987) and Israel-Palestine Conflict

By Mosarrap H. Khan
One of the soldiers accompanies the old man back to where the horse has wandered into. Other soldiers gather and take turns to fire bullets from the Israeli side to scare it back into the Palestinian territory. The old man feels restless and requests the Israeli soldiers to stop firing. He wants to risk mines and cross into the no-man’s land to rescue his favorite horse.