The Blog of Cafe Dissensus Magazine – we DISSENT

Posts tagged ‘Bangladesh’

Short Story: The virgin whore

By Rashid Askari
Really the Hindu girls were sweeter than the Muslim ones. He claimed to be a devout Muslim. He disliked everything of other religions except for women. He loved to graze in others’ fields leaping over the fence. He became the right producer of Angurbala.

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Book Review: Rashid Askari’s ‘Nineteen Seventy One and Other Stories’

By Bina Biswas
In Nineteen Seventy One and Other Stories, Askari’s fictional aesthetic focuses on the exploration of characters, their motive, and psychology. His privileging of psychology over plot, characters’ interiority over external action frees his stories from the generic conventions of popular fiction. In the true modernist vein, the stories bring together psychological realism and physicality.

Papiya Ghosh’s Writings on Bihari Muslims

By Raziuddin Aquil
Unlike Papiya Ghosh, no other historian of Islam and Muslims in the Hindu majority province of Bihar and its adjoining areas, including parts of eastern UP, has been able to come up with a more synthetic account of the murky history of the community, with all its social stratifications and religious diversities (ashraf/arzal, Shia/Sunni, etc.). 

Book Review: ‘Between the Map and the Memory’

By Bhaswati Ghosh
Given the ongoing nature of personal histories forged by the Partition of India, re-storying seems not only a worthwhile but even a necessary exercise, if one is to make sense of the histories that stitch the lacerated subconscious of the populace scattered over India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh.

Bangladesh: A Nation Divided

By Mosarrap H. Khan
About a month after I watched these two films in Kolkata, I landed in Dhaka toward the middle of December, 2011 with the twin purpose of attending a conference of Bengal studies and conducting research for my study on Muslim everyday life in the sub-continent. Once in Dhaka, I could feel an air of excitement and celebration on the occasion of Bangladesh’s fortieth anniversary of its independence.

Photo Essay: Geneva Camp, Dhaka

By Mosarrap H. Khan
There are around 5000 families living in the camp and there are only about 200 toilets. There are no schools and healthcare facilities in the camp. There is a high drop-out rate among school-going children. Most of the inhabitants of the camp work as mechanics, drivers, cooks, and domestic help.

What led a nation to Shahbag and where it leads to?

By Zahid Husain
The ongoing war crimes trials and the fallout from the verdicts justify the necessity of a progressive movement like Shahbag. The movement epitomizes the frustrations of generations who disapprove of the path Bangladesh has been walking since its independence. A country that adopted secularism as its fundamental tenet has drifted too far from its original promise of a progressive society. Bangladesh and Shahbag in that respect share a converging future, as the outcomes of this movement will ultimately determine the long term status of Bangladesh.