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Posts tagged ‘Book Review’

Book Review: Ira Mukhoty’s ‘Daughters of the Sun: Empresses, Queens and Begums of the Mughal Empire’

By Fahad Hashmi
The book, it goes without saying, digs out the Mughal haram from the Oriental fantasy as well as its wild imagination about zenana’s licentious sex and other obsessions. One finds that Daughters of the Sun is an effort at restoring and endowing agency on Mughal women.

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Book Review: Ampat Koshy’s Birds of Different Feathers

By Santosh Bakaya
One of the poems in the book also transported me to the iconic filmmaker Andrei Tarkovsky’s Sacrifice. (Andrei Tarkovsky’s Sacrifice, p. 56). It was while my daughter was doing a Film Appreciation Course, that I also happened to see all of Tarkovsky’s films along with her.

Book Review: Sumana Roy’s ‘Missing’

By Suranjana Choudhury
The beauty of her narration lies not in unnecessary elaboration. The details are necessary because through the exterior Roy tells us about the interior worlds of characters. The action is as much internal as it is external. Readers will appreciate that this simultaneity serves to introduce an interesting order to a series of thoughts and experiences.

Book Review: Udayaditya Mukherjee’s ‘Rhythms in Solitude’

By Amrita Mukherjee
The poems in Rhythms in Solitude are exactly that. It could be written about a far-flung place you have never been to, about a temptress you have never seen or about a love that you have never experienced, but you feel like you are there sitting next to the author as he sees a drop of dew dislodge itself from the leaves of a tree, as he experiences the flurry in his heart when he writes about falling in love for the first time.

Book Review: Abhirup Dhar’s ‘Stories Are Magical’

By Sankha Ghosh
In his latest venture, Abhirup takes you through different arrays of emotion and characters with each of his story varying widely in its genre and shade. Throughout the book, you come across perfectly white collars to the crusty sleeves, piety to impiety and an angel to a grievous angel. You have it all.

Review Essay: Shashi Tharoor’s ‘Why I am a Hindu’

By Mohan Ramanan
Tharoor’s Hinduism is both a result of a particular practice and an understanding of its tenets mainly from English translations. Many of us English educated people (I count myself among them) like Tharoor also got to know our Hinduism from a reading of translations of the Vedas,  Upanishads and The Gita, and the writings of Sri Aurobindo, Swami Vivekananada, and Radhakrishnan.

Book Review: Sanjoy Hazarika’s ‘Strangers No More: New Narratives from India’s Northeast’

By Namrata Pathak
Strangers No More: New Narratives from India’s Northeast is a sequel to Sanjoy Hazarika’s polemical and densely packed, Strangers of the Mist, a book that is remarkably different on the ground that it projects the insider’s brush with the North-East of India, a patch of land that is enveloped in a mist, a hazy blanket of half-truths, impenetrable and insular.

Book Review: Kamran Shahid Ansari’s ‘Emergence of the Islamic State and its impact on the Muslim Organisations in India’

By Fahad Hashmi
Besides using Wikipedia contents, the book borrows from Orientalist scholars like Bernard Lewis, Daniel Pipe, and Gilles Kepel. The author has also quoted some Indian journalists including Praveen Swami. The ideological orientation of these scholars and journalists is an open secret. In the end, the book turns out to be contradicting its own arguments.