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Posts tagged ‘Book Review’

Book Review: Edward Snowden’s ‘Permanent Record’

By Rashid Abbasi
The book is full of instances where Snowden unravels interesting information about how modern espionage works. For example, the sophistication in signal intelligence has made embassies a safe haven for espionage, where spies often disguise themselves as diplomats.

Book Review: Gopal Lahiri’s ‘Return to Solitude: haiku and other short poems’

By Nishi Pulugurtha
Gopal Lahiri’s Return to Solitude: haiku and other short poems, published by Hawakal Publishers, is a slim volume of poetry written in genres not very often used in India. A bilingual poet who has authored seven collections of poems in English and Bengali, editor, critic and translator, Lahiri has also written short stories.

The need for ‘Love After Babel’

By Chanchal Kumar
Love After Babel will be remembered as the prime example of a poet’s love letter to language, which can be a reluctant, unyielding beloved. Its appearance in our midst couldn’t have been timelier. We needed a Love After Babel to remind us why Dalit poetry has always been far superior to Brahmin-savarna’s, in other words, the mainstream’s attempts at writing verse, not that we had any doubt to begin with.

The “radical middle” in ‘Post-Colonial Poems’: Reviewing Kamal Kumar Tanti’s poetry in translation

By Sabreen Ahmed
The river is a dominant imagery in the recent collection. The river acts as a symbolic repository of historical annals of slavery and hardship borne by his kinsmen from which there is no way of return. In the first poem “Death” from his award winning collection, Our Ancestor Marangburu, the trope of death and the river coexist as a corollary in a predestined inescapable existential closure.

Book Review: Reading Rabindranath: The Myriad Shades of a Genius (Ed. Sutapa Chaudhuri)

By Nishi Pulugurtha
Reading Rabindranath: The Myriad Shades of a Genius thus offers various interesting and critical readings of the work of the writer. It presents a comprehensive analysis of some of his works, analysing them in the light of modern theories, in the context of the times in which they were composed, and in the light of the major social issues that Tagore voiced so clearly and boldly in them.