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Posts tagged ‘Film Review’

‘Joker’ Review: The Rise of Joker

By Murtaza Ali Khan
It’s a pure masterstroke to cast De Niro in the role of a talk show host in the film. And despite the short screen time, De Niro’s influence can be felt all over the movie. If he doesn’t get an Oscar nomination for The Irishman then there is a great possibility that he may get it for Joker in the supporting category (of course, he can get nominated for both and that would really be something).

‘Phantom Thread’ (2017): A delectable work of immense pain and beauty

By Murtaza Ali Khan
Phantom Thread is a delectable work of immense pain and beauty that must be watched by anyone who likes to take his/her cinema just as seriously as a fussy Englishman takes his breakfast or a peremptory dressmaker his measurements.

Film Review: The Piano (1993)

By Aastha Joshi
The Piano is a movie everyone has been talking about ever since it was first played at Cannes where it won the Palme d’Or. It is one of those exceptional movies that is not just about a story, or some roles, but about a whole cosmos of feeling.

Film: Half-Truths and ‘Hamid’

By Mekhala Chattopadhyay
Aijaz Khan does not forge solutions or answers to what exists, but shows what is there, as a part of the lived experience. He does not answer the question whether Hamid retains the hope card through his teenage, and beyond. The discomfort is evident, but not spoken for or against.

‘Smug’: A dystopia of tradition-less existence

By Nabanita Sengupta
In a dark, scary world of collective amnesia stretched to its extreme, the only ray of hope is in form of the little girl who personifies a new beginning. ‘Smug’ raises questions, forces us to think but leaves each of us to find our own answers and undertake our own journeys.

Sam Peckinpah’s ‘Pat Garett and Billy the Kid’: The times maybe a changin’, but not me…

By Vivaan Shah
The images from Sam Peckinpah’s films seem to bubble and swell out of the filmmaker’s subconscious – what Freud called ‘the dream state’. Time and again he abandons chronological continuity and traditional film grammar in favour of the figurative. He has non-linear sequences instead of non-linear narratives, and deconstructs the very medium of cinema itself in an aggressively proto-Godardian fashion.