The Blog of Cafe Dissensus Magazine – we DISSENT

Posts tagged ‘Film’

Film: Ram Janmabhoomi Movement and ‘Mohalla Assi’

By Vivek Raj
“Lord Rama had gone to exile for peace and harmony of Ayodhya and their so-called devotees are fighting for building a temple.”

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The Demonisation of the Muslim Subject: An Analysis of ‘Kesari’ as a Nationalistic Enterprise

By Shyaonti Talwar
“No Mamma,” said my son with an air of finality and infinite wisdom. “He is not Indian. He is Muslim. He is Pakistani. You don’t know.” And then he added with the same certainty and show of infinite wisdom as he sensed me doubting his statement, “All Muslims are Pakistanis.”

Film: Half-Truths and ‘Hamid’

By Mekhala Chattopadhyay
Aijaz Khan does not forge solutions or answers to what exists, but shows what is there, as a part of the lived experience. He does not answer the question whether Hamid retains the hope card through his teenage, and beyond. The discomfort is evident, but not spoken for or against.

‘Smug’: A dystopia of tradition-less existence

By Nabanita Sengupta
In a dark, scary world of collective amnesia stretched to its extreme, the only ray of hope is in form of the little girl who personifies a new beginning. ‘Smug’ raises questions, forces us to think but leaves each of us to find our own answers and undertake our own journeys.

‘Victor’s History’: A reminder that rewriting history has never been as easy as it has become today

By Murtaza Ali Khan
Directed by a French-American filmmaker, named Nicolas Chevaillier, Victor’s History revolves around a proud son, Victor, who hires an African-Vietnamese investigative journalist, Dorian and an Indian documentary filmmaker, Zuhair in a bid to try and immortalize his late father by making a film about his great achievements. He firmly believes that his father deserves a permanent place in the annals of history.

Film: Women in ‘Lust Stories’

By Prashila Naik
Bhumi Pednekar, a generally fine actress, does wonders with this role. The scene where she serves tea to the two sets of parents and then walks towards the bedroom to serve the younger ‘couple’, is a stunning indictment of how deep-rooted class-divides will continue to remain, even if physical and sexual boundaries are crossed.

‘Watchmaker’: A brave experiment in Indian cinema

By Nabanita Sengupta
Anindya Banerjee in ‘Watchmaker’ does not entertain. He provokes the audience to think. Together with his actors, he raises uncomfortable questions regarding the extremely intangible notion of time and leaves the answer open. ‘Watchmaker’ does not answer any question; it opens up many new ones and therein lies its success. The film is multi-layered, and a brave attempt in Indian cinema to represent the abstract.