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Posts tagged ‘Murtaza Ali Khan’

‘Phantom Thread’ (2017): A delectable work of immense pain and beauty

By Murtaza Ali Khan
Phantom Thread is a delectable work of immense pain and beauty that must be watched by anyone who likes to take his/her cinema just as seriously as a fussy Englishman takes his breakfast or a peremptory dressmaker his measurements.

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Review: Netflix Series ‘Leila’

By Murtaza Ali Khan
There is a whole world of dystopian literature available for study but perhaps Deepa Mehta didn’t want to go beyond the idea of a squalid underbelly that has been best captured by films like Salaam Bombay and Slumdog Millionaire.

Pierre Gill: The Canadian Cinematographer

By Murtaza Ali Khan
At the 49th International Film Festival of India (IFFI), the most informative and comprehensive masterclass was delivered by noted Canadian cinematographer Pierre Gill who is known for his work on films like Blade Runner 2049, Arrival, Polytechnique, Outlander, and Casanova. The masterclass was aptly titled “Poetry in Motion”. Pierre Gill, who has twice won the prestigious American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) Award, is equally active in film as well as television.

‘Victor’s History’: A reminder that rewriting history has never been as easy as it has become today

By Murtaza Ali Khan
Directed by a French-American filmmaker, named Nicolas Chevaillier, Victor’s History revolves around a proud son, Victor, who hires an African-Vietnamese investigative journalist, Dorian and an Indian documentary filmmaker, Zuhair in a bid to try and immortalize his late father by making a film about his great achievements. He firmly believes that his father deserves a permanent place in the annals of history.

Sebastiano Riso’s ‘Una Famiglia’: A meditation on maternity and manipulation in a capitalistic world

By Murtaza Ali Khan
Shades of Michelangelo Antonioni’s cold detachment are evident in the way certain scenes are framed. Consider the scene, shot in a long continuous take, wherein a man hurts a woman’s private parts, just as we see the her begging him to go easy, the camera suddenly takes us outside the house into the everyday monotony as her screams become more and more distant, before returning to the house with the woman now sitting alone on her bed, writhing in agony.

An interview with actor, Govind Namdev

By Murtaza Ali Khan
In my opinion, the biggest challenge of acting in a film is the close up. While shooting a close up you only perform for the camera as usually you don’t have any character in front of you. There is only the camera and the cameraperson. So, the actor is expected to get into the skin of the character, perfecting the emotions to a tee.