The Blog of Cafe Dissensus Magazine – we DISSENT

Posts from the ‘Rural India’ category

Nirbhaya and Korpan Shah: Two Stories, Two Trajectories

By Nandini Ghosh
Korpan, on the other hand, is just the opposite of all that Nirbhaya represented – a mentally ill man, with little education and no stable job, hence with very few aspirations in life. Moreover, the aspersion of theft of a mobile phone made him more culpable for the crime he was accused of. It is almost believable that a mentally ill man with little money would be prone to committing such a crime.

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Ending the Practice of ‘Witch-Hunting’ in Assam: An Interview with Archana Bhattacharjee about Birubala Rabha’s Work

By Joyce Yarrow
‘Witch-hunting’ in Assam involves branding a woman as a witch or daini, mostly based on the declaration of an Ojha or Bez (quack doctor).This usually happens when villagers approach the village Ojha about someone who has a chronic ailment and the Ojah identifies a woman as the source of the sickness and she is branded as a daini or witch.

Book Review: Akhil Gupta’s ‘Red Tape: Bureaucracy, Structural Violence, and Poverty in India’

By EPM Swalih
Akhil Gupta’s study is different from other postcolonial scholars working within a western theoretical framework. He shows a unique way to engage with Euro-American theories. And that is why I began to love his work. His interrogation of the theories of governmentality, biopolitics, and sovereign ban results from his grounding in Mandi district of Western Uttar Pradesh, India. He compels us to think with the Euro-American theories only if we are able to critically approach them. I find his attempts in provincializing Europe[1] as one of the most rewarding tasks ever undertaken by the postcolonial scholars.

Letters from a Foreign Shore

By Rabindranath Tagore
This morning, the sun is beaming from time to time, a wind is blowing swiftly, tamarisk and lychee trees are sashaying and rustling in a sway, a variety of birds are calling out in as many different ways to enliven the forest’s morning assembly. Sitting in this large, companion-less bright and open second-floor room, I am delighted to see a row of boats on the canal and, across it, a village flanked by trees on both sides.

Rural India: Tales of children of the desert…

By Akshatha Shetty & Piyush Goswami
While some of the children travel with the villagers all round the year hopping from one fair to another, the others live in the neighboring slum areas. These kids cannot afford to go to school but they are quite happy doing what they do. When they are not hassling tourists, the kids are often seen collecting camel or cow dung, which is dried and later sold to herders and villagers as fuel.

Rural India: The day we met Krishna…

By Akshatha Shetty
Despite the early onset of winter, the scorching heat of Rajasthan enslaves every soul. Dust rose and settled like smoke from a dragon’s flared nostrils. Far ahead, we heard the familiar chattering of three Rajasthani women clad in vibrant colors. Their hips swayed to the tunes of the earth, while their shoulders bore the burden of poverty.