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Posts tagged ‘Pakistan’

Uri Attack: No Country for “Peaceniks”

By Avanti Chhatre
How does a perceptive individual from India, or even Pakistan, respond during such volatile times? By reflecting, thinking, and ultimately forming (and voicing) an informed opinion that supports the common good and humanity at large? Or by getting angrier by the day, creating hysteria, demonising the Pakistani people, and aggressively silencing those who may beg to differ with this strategy?

Nothing Honourable in Honour Killings

By Kouser Fathima
Ironically many boys from these families lead horrible lives, get into drugs, harass women, and indulge in gambling or worse crimes. But they are seldom shot or killed by the families. When was the last time a boy was killed for bringing dishonour to the family?

Book Review: Abubakar Siddique’s ‘The Pashtuns’

By Zaboor Ahmad
There has been considerable literature on the issue, but Abubakar Siddique’s The Pashtuns: The Unresolved Key to the Future of Pakistan and Afghanistan is detailed as he reflects on the issues from an insider’s perspective. The fascinating aspect of the book is that it not only fixes spotlight on cultural values of Afghanistan but also dilates on the political affairs of Pashtuns on both sides of the Durand line.

In Memoriam: Intizar Husain

By Raza Rumi
In fiction, Intizar Husain’s style was deeply influenced by the myriad streams of mythologies and fables from the Indian subcontinent and outside. In dozens of short stories that he wrote, symbols from past lives were invoked.

Book Review: Ayesha Jalal’s ‘The Pity of Partition: Manto’s Life, Times, and Work across the India-Pakistan Divide’

By Safia Begum
What also adds to the strength of the book are some hitherto unexplored sources like his personal unpublished letters that he received from his friends and admirers, also known as Manto Papers. No scholar has so far accessed these letters and these new archival sources offer a rare glimpse into Manto’s life and his times.

Book Review: ‘Between the Map and the Memory’

By Bhaswati Ghosh
Given the ongoing nature of personal histories forged by the Partition of India, re-storying seems not only a worthwhile but even a necessary exercise, if one is to make sense of the histories that stitch the lacerated subconscious of the populace scattered over India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh.

Photo Essay: Geneva Camp, Dhaka

By Mosarrap H. Khan
There are around 5000 families living in the camp and there are only about 200 toilets. There are no schools and healthcare facilities in the camp. There is a high drop-out rate among school-going children. Most of the inhabitants of the camp work as mechanics, drivers, cooks, and domestic help.

Book Review: Basharat Peer’s Curfewed Night

By Shaik Zakeer Hussain
Basharat Peer’s Curfewed Night (2010) is an intensely passionate memoir about the struggle for freedom and justice inpeer what one former U.S president described as the ‘world’s most dangerous place.’ The story of Kashmir is set against the backdrop of Peer’s life and his life is interwoven with the melancholy of his homeland and its inhabitants.

Film Review: The Reluctant Fundamentalist; Director – Mira Nair

By Mosarrap Hossain Khan
Nair, and her team of scriptwriters, which includes Mohsin Hamid himself, did what appears to be the most sensible. Take Changez’s story from the novel and replace the part played by the silent American visitor with that of an American journalist, Bobby, who doubles up as a CIA agent, more like his mentor, Prof. Rainier, who once worked as a CIA operative in Afghanistan.